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fuckyeahchinesefashion:

一组日本摄影师拍摄的中国80年代少年儿童的摄影作品,看完,眼泪在打滚,那时候天很蓝,水很净~
fuckyeahchinesefashion:

一组日本摄影师拍摄的中国80年代少年儿童的摄影作品,看完,眼泪在打滚,那时候天很蓝,水很净~
fuckyeahchinesefashion:

一组日本摄影师拍摄的中国80年代少年儿童的摄影作品,看完,眼泪在打滚,那时候天很蓝,水很净~
fuckyeahchinesefashion:

一组日本摄影师拍摄的中国80年代少年儿童的摄影作品,看完,眼泪在打滚,那时候天很蓝,水很净~
fuckyeahchinesefashion:

一组日本摄影师拍摄的中国80年代少年儿童的摄影作品,看完,眼泪在打滚,那时候天很蓝,水很净~
fuckyeahchinesefashion:

一组日本摄影师拍摄的中国80年代少年儿童的摄影作品,看完,眼泪在打滚,那时候天很蓝,水很净~
fuckyeahchinesefashion:

一组日本摄影师拍摄的中国80年代少年儿童的摄影作品,看完,眼泪在打滚,那时候天很蓝,水很净~
fuckyeahchinesefashion:

一组日本摄影师拍摄的中国80年代少年儿童的摄影作品,看完,眼泪在打滚,那时候天很蓝,水很净~
Album Art
1,943 plays Source
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maryjblige:

cher & tina turner 1977
maryjblige:

cher & tina turner 1977
maryjblige:

cher & tina turner 1977
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rondraper:

ratsimons:

Anna Wintour at Proenza Schouler SS15

Me running away from that proenza collection
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shihlun:

Lauren Bacall
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actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
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orientallyyours:

The collaborative lacquer paintings and posters of the Luo Brothers 罗氏兄弟 subverts the traditional New Year Print or nianhua as well as propaganda posters through the juxtaposition of traditional folk art, symbolism, and objects of Western consumerism. In pre-communist China, nianhua was the most popular auspicious poster-form of expressing good luck and happiness, long life, and wealth, with New Year prints devoted to children as the most popular.
Sources: Queensland Art Gallery, Opera Gallery, ArtSpeak China, Australian Arts Digest,
orientallyyours:

The collaborative lacquer paintings and posters of the Luo Brothers 罗氏兄弟 subverts the traditional New Year Print or nianhua as well as propaganda posters through the juxtaposition of traditional folk art, symbolism, and objects of Western consumerism. In pre-communist China, nianhua was the most popular auspicious poster-form of expressing good luck and happiness, long life, and wealth, with New Year prints devoted to children as the most popular.
Sources: Queensland Art Gallery, Opera Gallery, ArtSpeak China, Australian Arts Digest,
orientallyyours:

The collaborative lacquer paintings and posters of the Luo Brothers 罗氏兄弟 subverts the traditional New Year Print or nianhua as well as propaganda posters through the juxtaposition of traditional folk art, symbolism, and objects of Western consumerism. In pre-communist China, nianhua was the most popular auspicious poster-form of expressing good luck and happiness, long life, and wealth, with New Year prints devoted to children as the most popular.
Sources: Queensland Art Gallery, Opera Gallery, ArtSpeak China, Australian Arts Digest,
orientallyyours:

The collaborative lacquer paintings and posters of the Luo Brothers 罗氏兄弟 subverts the traditional New Year Print or nianhua as well as propaganda posters through the juxtaposition of traditional folk art, symbolism, and objects of Western consumerism. In pre-communist China, nianhua was the most popular auspicious poster-form of expressing good luck and happiness, long life, and wealth, with New Year prints devoted to children as the most popular.
Sources: Queensland Art Gallery, Opera Gallery, ArtSpeak China, Australian Arts Digest,
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4archive:

An Interpretation, Erin O’Connor photographed by Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia Jul97, wearing Dior, styling by Joe McKenna
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leupagus:

fogbreaker:

pigeons are so dumb I love them so much

"dumb" my ass, you’d do this too if you could
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sovietbuildings:

Lithuania, Vilnius, State Academic Opera and Ballet TheatreDesigned by N.Bučiūtė
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pukeboy:

taavik:

heheh this gif is sold on ebay for nearly 6000 dollas*****NOT MINE*********

it’s not sold yet. the auction is still up.